Photo by seanfboggs on iStock

How can such a small number of flowers mean so much? After all, a bouquet's visually more impressive, so why do I have such fond memories of the few corsages I received over the years? Because it's a reminder of when things were more "old-fashioned" (but in a good way) and reflected a mixture of class and even elegance. Or, maybe it was because it came from a place of love and affection.

So, what made me even think about this? Well, it's prom season (although due to the pandemic, my daughter's prom was canceled), and recently on "Live with Kelly and Ryan," Kelly Ripa was talking about her son, Joaquin, going to prom. When I saw photos of him and his date, I couldn't help but notice her corsage (and his matching boutonniere), and it brought back memories as, years later, corsages still signify something sweet, enduring, and wonderful.

But corsages aren't only for proms. For me, corsages celebrated rites of passage, like my "formal" graduation ceremony from Schwarting Elementary School (I graduated in the early 1970s, so don't know if they still do that, but had to laugh when I saw how large the trees in front of the school had grown) and my Bat Mitzvah ceremony a few years later. And although I received a corsage from my date (who flew in from Switzerland for the occasion) when I attended my one and only prom, the only corsages that ever really mattered were the ones from one person,


I remember many things, but I honestly couldn't tell you what flowers were in the corsages my dad gave me. Still, I'll never forget they were always wrist corsages, which I loved for the ease and simplicity of being able to wear them as I wasn't the most coordinated girl in the world. Not that it mattered, for those corsages came with complete and unconditional love, and told me not only how much he loved me but that he was proud of me for whatever milestone event I was "dressed up" for. My dad could have made a corsage out of dandelions from the backyard, and even with my pollen allergies, it would have been the most beautiful corsage in the world.

Of course, I'm the more sentimental one, but I was curious whether Black had any memories of corsages, from our dad or any of her many prom dates (yes, you read that right),

I can barely remember my prom dates, let alone the corsages. However, I do remember each dress because I designed and made them myself. For me, proms were all about the fashion, and I am certain that I would have requested wrist corsages as not to put pinholes in my dress. But there is one corsage that does stand out in my mind, and that is the one First Lady Jill Biden wore to the inauguration.

So, I guess you are never too young or too old to wear wrist corsages … and create lifelong memories.

Underlying photo by Alleko on iStock


Red's Head assets.rebelmouse.io

I know that Yom Kippur isn't exactly known as one of the "fun" Jewish holidays, but every year I can't help but laugh at what's easily my number one Yom Kippur memory.


Black's Head Black assets.rebelmouse.io

That is what makes memories … memorable. And, finding something to laugh at on Yom Kippur, the Day of Atonement, which is probably the most important and solemn Jewish holiday, would be memorable.


Red's Head assets.rebelmouse.io

I can't believe you're not even curious what it is!?
Keep Reading ... Show less


Red's Head assets.rebelmouse.io


I'm still smiling at you letting Sawyer drive your Mercedes G-wagen. Although I know that her dream car's a Ford F-150, I think yours is her "fantasy car".


Black's Head Black assets.rebelmouse.io


I knew the "long way" to drive back to your house, but after asking her if she knew the best way, it seemed easier to have her drive.


Red's Head assets.rebelmouse.io


Well, you might have thought of it as efficient, but she thought it was exciting. And she told me that she was honored you trusted her to drive.


Black's Head Black assets.rebelmouse.io


Did she mention that once we got back to your neighborhood, we saw a huge turtle on the road? Moving very slowly, of course, so I was not concerned it would become an unexpected road obstacle.
Keep Reading ... Show less
Photo by Iam Anupong on iStock

I'll never forget the day. It was an "almost" ordinary day out on the golf course with my mom and dad during the heat of a Long Island summer. Now, if "Long Island" conjures up images of stately manors on the North Shore (think "Great Gatsby") or beachfront mansions in the Hamptons (think Robin Leach and his popular show "Lifestyles of the Rich and Famous"), you can put those out of your head. I'm not talking about some fancy country club golf course, just a regular public course.

I loved the game ever since I learned to play as a teenager, and although I never got to play while at college (Wake Forest, which was renowned for its golf program, with its most famous alumni being Arnold Palmer), I'd try to get out as often as possible when I was home. I wasn't a phenomenal player but had a decent game and natural talent. And most of the time, I hit it pretty straight, so one of the things I enjoyed was walking down the middle of the fairway, pulling my clubs along (no fancy golf carts on this course), appreciating the day and the sport.

On one (very rare) occasion, my sister came back to New York to visit, as she moved out of state as soon as she graduated from business school. She also played golf, but unlike me, who relied on natural ability and played for fun, she worked extremely hard at her game, was overly competitive, and played "business golf". The result was that she was a far better player than me, although I was holding my own on that day.

Keep Reading ... Show less