Photo by Louis Reed on Unsplash

Red, who's definitely not the business half of Red & Black, has heard over the years – especially from politicians and the media – that drug companies are the bad guys. Charging astronomical prices for drugs. Disclosing dangerous side effects or that it's potentially habit-forming. OK, they may be legally required to disclose that information but they do it at either the end of TV commercials in a way designed to make you "tune out" or, once you buy the drug, in the tiniest print. (OK, be honest, how many of you read the little pamphlet that comes with your medication? Red doesn't, and she was the straight-A student!)

Now, those same companies are spending millions and millions of dollars researching, developing, and testing drugs to prevent or treat Covid-19. Red, like many people, is thrilled at the news of seemingly successful vaccines rolling out any day now. However, at the risk of getting an unwanted business lesson on the drug industry, she comments to Black about all those previous conflicting impressions about the drug industry.

Black knows better than to try and explain to Red how you have to amortize R&D (research and development) expenses, or the fact that drug companies are businesses (not not-for-profit) so have a financial obligation to its shareholders. Not to mention, the issue of why manufacturing drugs has moved overseas. At this point, the bottom-line (pun intended) is that without more information you can't determine if drugs companies are going to be the good guys (although there's a financial implication, and accounting entry, for "goodwill") or the bad guys.

Time will tell … but meanwhile it provoked Black to ask:

Does doing good have to be mutually exclusive from doing well?
Photo by Rabbitti for iStock

It’s #GivingTuesday, and although it’s always a good time to think of others, remember all the people who are continuing to deal with the aftermath of natural disasters long after the headlines have been forgotten.

And even though Black believes charitable giving can be “secretive”, she also knows there’s science proving helping others is good for you. (Warning: she likes to recommend the book “Wonder Drug: 7 Scientifically Proven Ways That Serving Others Is the Best Medicine for Yourself.“)

P.S. – Wherever you may choose to donate, beware of potential scammers. So, if in doubt – check them out! (Black likes GuideStar and Charity Navigator.)



red headred head assets.rebelmouse.io

I know today’s Giving Tuesday, but what I always find so amazing is how you treat every day as “Giving Tuesday."


Black's HeadBlack assets.rebelmouse.io

What makes you say that? I do not donate to an organization or charity every day.


red headred head assets.rebelmouse.io

You’re always so literal. I meant that the spirit of “giving to others”, whether donating or providing support in some way, seems to be part of your daily life.


Black's HeadBlack assets.rebelmouse.io

I think you are exaggerating.
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Photo courtesy of Red’s eldest daughter, Natasha


red headred head assets.rebelmouse.io

At the risk of asking you a warm and fuzzy question, have you thought about what you’re most thankful for this Thanksgiving?


Black's HeadBlack assets.rebelmouse.io

Yes.


red headred head assets.rebelmouse.io

I should’ve guessed that you’d take the question literally. Could you expand on that a little, or at least give me a hint?
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Photo by htomas for iStock

When Red was a child, toilets represented more than a place to go when, well, you had to go. Much to Black’s amusement, Red saw cleaning them as a reward. (Really! Check out Red's post below.) But neither of us realized that billions of people don’t have access to toilets. And if it weren’t for today being World Toilet Day, we never would have known the magnitude of the associated health and safety issues – or the connection between sanitation and groundwater.

RED: What can I tell you? When I was a kid, one of my all-time favorite things to do was … clean the toilet. Yes, you read that correctly. And it wasn’t because I was a germophobe or a clean freak. I just loved being able to sit on the floor, using as much Bon Ami (I’ve no idea why I remember the brand) cleaning powder as I wanted. And the best part? All those bubbles!

It kept me entertained for hours. Not to mention, my mom was thrilled because it kept me “contained” and out of her hair. So much so that if I was very good and behaved myself, she might even give me “special permission” to clean the toilet in my parent’s bathroom. Of course, Black, being five years older and understanding the situation, found it all extremely amusing. Even now, decades later, she still gives me grief about it,

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