Is "spring forward, fall back" just another way of saying, "one step forward, one step back?"

BANTER BITE BACKSTORY: It's nice having more daylight at the end of the day, although the trade-off is it's darker in the mornings.

Not to mention you "lose" an hour's sleep. Of course, in six months the reverse will be true. You'll enjoy an extra hour's sleep, but it will get darker earlier, so the days seem shorter. Welcome to Daylight Saving Time. (Unless you live in one of the states or territories that doesn't participate in this practice.)

But what exactly is it and how did it begin? Red, being the straight-A student, was curious and she found her answers (and more) in a quick search on the computer. (It would be hard to picture Black reading anything in the Farmer's Almanac.) Red had to share with her sister that the concept went as far back as Benjamin Franklin but really took hold at the beginning of the 20th century, and finally came into its own at the start of World War II when President Franklin Roosevelt re-established Daylight Saving Time year-round, calling it "War Time."

Black, used to her sister's love of history, listened politely for a few minutes, and then asked Red if she knew why the change occurs at 2 a.m. and not midnight? And explained it was a political/business decision to minimize the inconvenience to railroad schedules. She then went on to discuss how it has become a political issue (hasn't everything?!).

Regardless of whether you think Daylight Saving Time is a great idea or should be rescinded, you need to remember it happens this weekend. For those of you tethered to digital gizmos, if you're awake in the very early hours on Sunday morning, you can watch as the time jumps from 1:59 a.m. to 3:00 a.m. Meanwhile, most of us will wake to find we have to run around re-setting kitchen appliances and old-fashioned clocks.

Are you familiar with Hispanic Heritage Month? If not, maybe it’s time.

BANTER BITE BACKSTORY: It seems like every month has a “national celebration”, and although we both agree there’s so much to celebrate during Hispanic Heritage Month, Red initially focused on the strange timing (starting mid-month) while Black focused on the lesser known (yet significant) achievements of the Hispanic community, as well as a name-calling incident that she can’t forget.

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Can we agree to disagree? No, we’re not talking politics – we’re talking pumpkin spice.

BANTER BITE BACKSTORY: Fall has become the season of pumpkin, or more specifically pumpkin spice; which Red absolutely loves for various reasons while, for Black, besides the fact she doesn’t like the flavor, it just screams, well, MARKETING.

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In a promise to “never forget” we’re rerunning our 2021 post so that we always remember …

September 11 is a date on the calendar, but "9/11" is a date in history.

BANTER BITE BACKSTORY: Much like JFK's assassination was to an older generation (although Black's old enough to be included), we both remember exactly what we were doing when we first heard the news of the attacks on the Twin Towers, Pentagon, and Flight 93; but, interestingly, how we reflect on 9/11 is a bit of a role reversal.

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