Is "spring forward, fall back" just another way of saying, "one step forward, one step back?"

BANTER BITE BACKSTORY: It's nice having more daylight at the end of the day, although the trade-off is it's darker in the mornings.

Not to mention you "lose" an hour's sleep. Of course, in six months the reverse will be true. You'll enjoy an extra hour's sleep, but it will get darker earlier, so the days seem shorter. Welcome to Daylight Saving Time. (Unless you live in one of the states or territories that doesn't participate in this practice.)

But what exactly is it and how did it begin? Red, being the straight-A student, was curious and she found her answers (and more) in a quick search on the computer. (It would be hard to picture Black reading anything in the Farmer's Almanac.) Red had to share with her sister that the concept went as far back as Benjamin Franklin but really took hold at the beginning of the 20th century, and finally came into its own at the start of World War II when President Franklin Roosevelt re-established Daylight Saving Time year-round, calling it "War Time."

Black, used to her sister's love of history, listened politely for a few minutes, and then asked Red if she knew why the change occurs at 2 a.m. and not midnight? And explained it was a political/business decision to minimize the inconvenience to railroad schedules. She then went on to discuss how it has become a political issue (hasn't everything?!).

Regardless of whether you think Daylight Saving Time is a great idea or should be rescinded, you need to remember it happens this weekend. For those of you tethered to digital gizmos, if you're awake in the very early hours on Sunday morning, you can watch as the time jumps from 1:59 a.m. to 3:00 a.m. Meanwhile, most of us will wake to find we have to run around re-setting kitchen appliances and old-fashioned clocks.

It’s hard to believe the topic of the Supreme Court and abortion could become any more controversial or dramatic. But there was no way to know a draft opinion overturning Roe v. Wade would be leaked to the press. A situation so shocking, it’s being compared to the "Pentagon Papers" leak.

Yes, leaks happen all the time in politics – at the campaign level, sometimes from Congress, and even on occasion from the executive branch. But from the Supreme Court of the United States??? Yet as Black said to Red just after it happened,

Nowadays, it is just too easy to have a “leak” as almost everything is just a “click away” from being shared or printed. No clandestine nights at the copy machine are required.

There’s an expression … throwing out the baby with the bathwater. Well, Supreme Court decisions on “babies” (well, technically fetuses) may also impact its integrity.

BANTER BITE BACKSTORY: There’s no question the recent Supreme Court cases involving abortion are controversial and may have a major impact on Roe v. Wade; something that both Red (as a mom to two daughters) and Black (as a highly independent woman who made the conscious decision not to have children) have strong feelings about, albeit focused on two very different aspects.

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If you’ve never thought about May Day, don’t worry, most of us haven’t.

BANTER BITE BACKSTORY: Red appreciates that some holidays have historical significance, some have ancient traditions, and some are opportunities for one of Black’s unexpected, but often amusing and clever, comments, but May Day checks all those boxes.

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To quote the lyrics from "West Side Story," “Could be … who knows …”

BANTER BITE BACKSTORY: Red, the theater major and lover of Broadway musicals, has loved "West Side Story" for as long as she can remember, so imagine her surprise when Black, usually only interested in the business aspects of the entertainment world, shared a “new” fact (at least, new to Red) about one of the most popular musicals ever produced.

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