The Sabbath provides a time for prayer and reflection, so maybe the Senate should take that break.

BANTER BITE BACKSTORY: This Banter Bite was almost canceled … but then we decided it was still relevant.

First, a little backstory to the backstory … earlier in the week David Schoen, one of Trump's lead impeachment trial lawyers, advised that he's an observant Jew who strictly adheres to the commandment against working on the Sabbath. This would mean that if the trial wasn't concluded before sundown on Friday, he'd be unavailable starting at sundown and running through Saturday.

Now, when Red first heard of this request, which came with an apology for the inconvenience, she couldn't help but wonder how it would be received – especially since Congress (and, let's face it, many of us) are hoping for a speedy trial. And, while she read that the schedule for the trial hadn't been finalized, the history buff in her was interested to learn that during impeachment trials the Senate would meet Monday through Saturday and only break on Sunday.

The official response? An allowance would be made for Mr. Schoen. Although the decision didn't really surprise Red, Black's thoughts on the matter did.

Amidst all the chaos and politics of Trump's second impeachment, the request for a break to observe the Jewish Sabbath provided a perfect reminder of the importance of faith and religious tolerance. And how, in reality, there are many similarities between the world's religions.
Red had been so focused on thinking of the request in terms of the Sabbath itself (the day and its prayers and "formalities") that she hadn't stopped to think about it in terms of the importance of it being a "day of rest" after the creation of the universe to reflect – on the world and what's truly important.

A few days later the request was withdrawn, with Mr. Schoen indicating that he wouldn't participate during the Sabbath, but the balance of the defense team could handle the proceedings. And that's when we thought about cancelling the Banter Bite, until Black pointed out to Red that it didn't change our conversation about the importance of religious tolerance.

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BANTER BITE BACKSTORY: It's probably safe to say that most of us, including Red, think of old age and its implications in a very personal way, either in terms of ourselves or loved ones. But not Black, who often says, "Aging beats the alternative," and looked at retirement from a business perspective, but now sees how it impacts all of us in terms of elected officials.

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BANTER BITE BACKSTORY: We grew up hearing the expression "the customer is always right," and Red certainly agreed with it; and while Black understood the customer service aspect of it, she did question its impact on employees (why would you "automatically" side with a customer over an employee without knowing the details). And that was before the pandemic changed everything, but especially customer behavior.

Until recently, Red didn't think much about why the customer was "always right," but it reminded her of years ago when Black shared her amusing (or, at least, to Red) version of the Golden Rule, "He who has the gold, rules. "So, wouldn't that also apply to customers? Wouldn't a happy customer be a loyal customer?

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