Rainbows are beautiful and suggest something magical. But during Pride Month, they also become a symbol of love, support, and understanding for the LGBTQ community.

BANTER BITE BACKSTORY: Until yesterday, when Black explained it to her, Red, like many people, didn't realize that Pride Month evolved from a tragic event, the Stonewall Uprising, into both a tribute and a memorial before it became a worldwide celebration of the LGBTQ community.


In fact, Red believes that if she hadn't pursued a theater degree at college, she might have gone decades without getting to know someone that was gay. However, looking back, she's sure that she had high school classmates who would later be able to identify themselves as LGBTQ, but back then had to keep it a secret in fear of being bullied, ostracized, or possibly even disowned by their families.

I was a freshman at Wake Forest University, a Baptist school in North Carolina in 1980, so not someplace you would expect to find an outwardly gay person. However, I spent almost all of my time at the theater department, which is where I first met "Bryan." You couldn't help but become friends with him because he was so incredibly funny and talented. But there was something else about him, and although initially I couldn't quite put my finger on it, I soon realized that he was gay. I had grown up sheltered (that's an understatement) in a neighborhood that was almost exclusively Jews and Italians, and now was at a school that was even more "white bread" than that, but my only thought was, "Ok, cool, now I know a gay person."

Black, being five years older and having gone to school in New York City and then London, was more worldly than Red (that's not saying much), not to mention she tended to date much more than Red did.

I was at London Business School, and this was 1978, back when private clubs and discos (like Tramp's and Annabel's) were all the rage. One of the other Americans, Bob, a very handsome Black man, invited me to go clubbing with him. I got all dressed up for a night on the town, and the minute we walked into the first club, I felt like a kid in a candy store – it was filled with incredibly good-looking men, and I seemed to be one of the few women. The odds were in my favor. But then, the penny dropped, and I asked Bob if this was a gay club. It was, and I think it was his way of letting me know he was gay (or maybe he thought I already knew), but I thought it cruel. It was like being in that candy store, but being told you can look, but you cannot touch.

As Baby Boomers, our opinions and attitudes toward LGBTQ were influenced by our first encounters, so we saw them as people who merely had different sexual preferences. Full stop. Red's daughters, who are 18 and 22, laugh at the fact their mom and aunt can remember their "first time" as so many of their friends are LGBTQ. No big deal.

So, what can we each do to celebrate Pride Month and show our support? Of course, Red loves the idea of cooking, watching movies, and reading books, while Black knows there are many highly effective workplace activities. But what's most important is finding a way to commemorate and bring awareness to a population that includes our families, our friends, our neighbors, our communities.

How times change … there once was a fictional TV show called "Lost In Space" … now there's going to be a real-life "Seat In Space" …

BANTER BITE BACKSTORY: When Red heard that "mere mortals" (translation in this case meaning non-astronauts) were going to be launched into space, all she could think of was how that sounded both scary and exciting, whereas Black, unsurprisingly, had much more pragmatic thoughts.

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Sometimes you don't miss something until it's gone. But was it the movies? The escape? Or the popcorn?

BANTER BITE BACKSTORY: For both Red and Black (but for different reasons), it seemed like the day (or rather weekend) would never come when Red would feel comfortable, post-pandemic, going back to the movies; but Red never expected the stumbling block would involve one of her favorite things.

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And Red thinks she receives a lot of emails from her sister, Black. Well, that's nothing compared to the approximately 1,000 emails a day that Dr. Fauci received during the height of the pandemic.

BANTER BITE BACKSTORY: The release of thousands of pages of Dr. Fauci's emails has generated a remarkable amount of media coverage, each putting their own "spin" on it (has anyone compared it to the Pentagon Papers yet?) and, of course, Red sees things very differently than Black.

Red, the straight-A- student, knew there was no way she'd read through the mountain of emails made available through the Freedom of Information Act but was curious what all the fuss was about. It didn't take long, whether just through scanning the headlines or watching a few video clips, to see that there were a handful of key take-aways. But her theater degree kicked in when Red wondered if an alien from another planet appeared (well, UFOs have been in the news lately), if they would think Dr. Fauci was a celebrity scientist given his cult status or a political traitor specializing in scientific espionage.

Regardless, Red couldn't help but wonder (out loud to Black) why any of us "mere mortals" would feel compelled to read through such an enormous volume of emails. And, Black's response?

Remember the word problems we did in school? Here is a new one … if the average email Dr. Fauci received consisted of 100 words, which would be relatively short and to the point (this paragraph contains 67 words), and it takes two minutes to read 500 words, how many hours would it take to read 4,000 emails? Yes, the answer can be calculated, but who cares?

Well, if nothing else, Black's approach to things is consistent – pragmatic and sarcastic. And Dr. Fauci's also consistent. From the smattering we've seen, his emails "read" like he comes across on TV – humble, logical, unemotional, and polite. But, just as would be expected if culling through thousands of someone's emails, some may be interesting, but most would probably be boring. Of course, Black can't help but mention another thing to consider,

Remember when you were going through your "crisis" and I was explaining some financial topic to you, and I declared that, "You are my best student. Ever." Technically that statement was accurate, although, at that point, you were also my only student. So, there is no way to know if quotes from the emails have been taken out of context without going back to the source documents. And, personally, I have much better things to do with my time.

Black certainly brings up an excellent point. We all have more important things to do than spend our weekends on electronic gizmos, so we respectfully request that you stop reading this … and find something more important to do …