When it comes to species becoming extinct, you can be mad … you can be sad … just don't be indifferent.

BANTER BITE BACKSTORY: Red can remember learning about extinct species as a kid, whether in the classroom or when she'd visit the awe-inspiring American Museum of Natural History in New York City. But let's face it, learning about dinosaurs or woolly mammoths, doesn't make the topic of extinction seem relevant today. (Even if, as Red points out, the movie "Night at the Museum" gives an amusing perspective of how "creatures" from the past might see today's world).


However, when U.S. scientists announced 23 species as extinct, it made headlines around the world. And although the list included many species we may never have heard of, it did include the ivory-billed woodpecker, which was once the nation's largest woodpecker (but was last spotted almost 80 years ago, well before there ever were "protected" lists).

Black, of course, went back to the actual U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS) announcement and saw where, technically, the 23 species had not yet been declared extinct, the USFWS was proposing "delisting" them from the Endangered Species List (created as part of the 1973 Endangered Species Act). In other words, they had given up all hope. But there was a 60-day comment period before they were declared gone forever. (She couldn't help but wonder what happens if they're spotted after being declared extinct, would they no longer be protected?)

Regardless, if you're looking at this from an emotional perspective or solely scientific,

The successful efforts of the Endangered Species Act can only do so much, and although the reasons for extinction may vary, humans were the ultimate cause. And there's no denying that we're going to see more extinctions if we don't do more in terms of conservation.

Are you familiar with Hispanic Heritage Month? If not, maybe it’s time.

BANTER BITE BACKSTORY: It seems like every month has a “national celebration”, and although we both agree there’s so much to celebrate during Hispanic Heritage Month, Red initially focused on the strange timing (starting mid-month) while Black focused on the lesser known (yet significant) achievements of the Hispanic community, as well as a name-calling incident that she can’t forget.

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Can we agree to disagree? No, we’re not talking politics – we’re talking pumpkin spice.

BANTER BITE BACKSTORY: Fall has become the season of pumpkin, or more specifically pumpkin spice; which Red absolutely loves for various reasons while, for Black, besides the fact she doesn’t like the flavor, it just screams, well, MARKETING.

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In a promise to “never forget” we’re rerunning our 2021 post so that we always remember …

September 11 is a date on the calendar, but "9/11" is a date in history.

BANTER BITE BACKSTORY: Much like JFK's assassination was to an older generation (although Black's old enough to be included), we both remember exactly what we were doing when we first heard the news of the attacks on the Twin Towers, Pentagon, and Flight 93; but, interestingly, how we reflect on 9/11 is a bit of a role reversal.

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