It was like any other weekday morning, a tumbler of hot coffee on my desk and the morning news on the TV in the background, as I brace myself as I open Outlook. Computer issues? Nope, especially now that I have a new computer. Instead, it's the daily onslaught of emails generated by Black as she seems to do her best thinking while the rest of us are sleeping.

Well, the subject line of one of her emails, "Crazy idea?", stands out and I open it to find an image of a Good Humor truck and a leading question:


Remember the Good Humor trucks that would come by every day every summer when we were growing up in New York?

Of course, I do! They were one of my favorite summer memories, and definitely the highlight of any given day, as the sound of the Good Humor truck would have me shouting to my dad and racing to the bottom of our driveway, impatiently waiting for my beloved Strawberry Shortcake ice cream pop. Often, my dad was right there beside me, sometimes to get a Chocolate Éclair bar, sometimes just to be there to enjoy my excitement. One of the luxuries of having a home office.

But, as usual, I digress. After momentarily wandering down memory lane, I continued reading. I know that Black doesn't usually reminisce, so figured that it probably something to do with the business side of ice cream. (Especially since I'm not sure she even eats ice cream as she's so committed to staying a size 2.) But I'd never have connected these dots:

Obviously, the Good Humor trucks were set up with freezers. Since the COVID-19 vaccines require refrigeration, I could not help but wonder if there could be "Good Health" trucks in neighborhoods where people do not have easy access to pharmacies, doctors, or hospitals to receive the vaccines.

Not knowing whether to laugh or roll my eyes, I just stop and think about it. And then I remember how I've known for a long time that Black's brain doesn't work the way most of ours do. Of course, this is just a "crazy idea" as her subject line indicates. Or, is it?

We know there currently are shortages of the vaccine, and challenges with distribution. But as vaccine supplies improve, wouldn't it be wonderful for communities to have the same excitement when they heard the sound of the Good Health truck as I did when I heard the Good Humor ice cream truck?

Photo courtesy of Red


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I know that you’ve been involved with Make-A-Wish for decades, and it’s an amazing organization, but I’m not sure why you made such a big deal about the recent Texas Gulf Coast & Louisiana chapter ’s dedication of its building. I appreciate that you were part of the planning group, but with all due respect, it’s just a building.

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I don’t expect you to remember that it all started in 1980 when Tommy Austin wanted to do something special for a young boy, Chris Greicius, who was battling leukemia and wanted to be a policeman. That wish became a reality and the start of The Make-A-Wish Foundation.


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That story has always inspired me as it makes you realize the difference that just one person can make. But the building wasn’t named after Chris or Tommy, so I’m still confused.
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I may not celebrate Rosh Hashanah by going to temple, and now that the girls are no longer home for the holiday, I don’t prepare a seder with the traditional foods . But I know and appreciate that it’s one of the most important Jewish holidays, as it’s a time for reflection on the past and hope for the future. And this year, between world events, where I feel surrounded by so much negativity, and on the personal front, with Mom’s passing, it seems more important than ever before.


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Although Rosh Hashanah is filled with traditions, like apples dipped in honey because it is believed apples have healing properties (think of the rhyme, “an apple a day keeps the doctor away”), and the honey signifies the hope for a new year that will be sweet … it is still incredibly relevant. In today’s hectic world, a contemplative holiday where you stop and think about the road you have traveled over the last year (including any wrong turns) and where you would like to go in the future may be exactly what we all need.

We wish everyone who celebrates Rosh Hashanah a happy and sweet New Year. And remember, you don’t have to be Jewish to look back and reflect … and then try to do better in the future.

Design by Sawyer Pennington, Underlying photo by Jon Tyson on Unsplash


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So, I had to smile when Sawyer came to visit us at Mom’s estate sale. And even though I had seen her only a few hours before, I gave her a hug.


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Yes, you make it rather obvious that you are warm and fuzzy. And, a hugger.


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But what made me laugh was when she greeted you by acknowledging that you weren’t a hugger. Now there’s an understatement.


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No, it is merely a fact.


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I never realized, though, just how much both Natasha and Sawyer are like you. Although they begrudgingly let me hug them, they’d both be just as happy with a handshake. If that.


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Maybe a fist bump?
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