None of us knows everything, so we shouldn't pretend to have all the answers.

BANTER BITE BACKSTORY: It was the first full day of the new administration and the first time Dr. Anthony Fauci appeared at a White House press briefing in a long time. Earlier in the day President Biden had announced his COVID-19 strategy, which included a wide range of aggressive and immediate actions. Red, who tends to have the news on in the afternoon, couldn't help but take a brief pause from Red & Black (don't tell Black!) to listen to what the doctor had to say. Especially as Red's such a huge fan of his that Black had bought her a Dr. Fauci bobblehead which now sits on her desk.

After listening to his usual measured, thorough, and thoughtful answers, she was about to focus again on work when she heard a reporter ask a question that he didn't have an answer for, and that's when Dr. Fauci's response grabbed her full attention, "One of the new things in this administration is, if you don't know the answer, don't guess. Just say you don't know the answer." After thinking to herself how that was an incredibly honest and direct answer, she then laughed, thinking that his mother would've been so proud of him.

Black prefers to read her news and early in the morning had seen a summary of the presidential actions, so when Red mentioned Dr. Fauci's statement (Black knows she often has the television on while working), she hadn't yet read about the White House's afternoon briefing and that specific quote. She, too, is a fan of Dr. Fauci, not only for his expertise but for his blunt language and explanations. When she read AP's "Fauci unleashed: Doc takes 'liberating' turn at center stage," she realized that Dr. Fauci was sharing more than COVID-19 knowledge, he was sharing lessons that are important in business – and in life. Admitting when you don't know the answer, conflict management, and how to choose your words carefully.

As voters, should we care whether people on the ballot are mentally capable of holding the job?

BANTER BITE BACKSTORY: It's probably safe to say that most of us, including Red, think of old age and its implications in a very personal way, either in terms of ourselves or loved ones. But not Black, who often says, "Aging beats the alternative," and looked at retirement from a business perspective, but now sees how it impacts all of us in terms of elected officials.

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How do you look back at the "good 'ole days" if they happened before you were even born?

BANTER BITE BACKSTORY: We read the same Axios story about "TikTok's nostalgia economy," and although the focus was "media trends" due to younger people using social media to both make fun of older people and also to flashback nostalgically, of course, we focused on very different aspects of the story.

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Want good customer service? Good behavior is a good start.

BANTER BITE BACKSTORY: We grew up hearing the expression "the customer is always right," and Red certainly agreed with it; and while Black understood the customer service aspect of it, she did question its impact on employees (why would you "automatically" side with a customer over an employee without knowing the details). And that was before the pandemic changed everything, but especially customer behavior.

Until recently, Red didn't think much about why the customer was "always right," but it reminded her of years ago when Black shared her amusing (or, at least, to Red) version of the Golden Rule, "He who has the gold, rules. "So, wouldn't that also apply to customers? Wouldn't a happy customer be a loyal customer?

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