September 11 is a date on the calendar, but "9/11" is a date in history.

BANTER BITE BACKSTORY: Much like JFK's assassination was to an older generation (although Black's old enough to be included), we both remember exactly what we were doing when we first heard the news of the attacks on the Twin Towers, Pentagon, and Flight 93; but, interestingly, how we reflect on 9/11 is a bit of a role reversal.


Red, being a lover of history, thinks about 9/11 unemotionally, focuses on what led up to it and what has happened since, although she doesn't deny the feelings of total disbelief and sadness. Black, usually the pragmatic sister, remembers the power of the emotions the country felt. First, feelings of shock and grief, immediately followed by an overwhelming need to help, and then the realization that what makes America great is our collective pride, courage, and compassion. Feelings that 20 years later are difficult to forget … or are they?

Rightfully so, there's an overwhelming number of TV specials about 9/11, its history, the 20-year aftermath, the politics. And a long list of books, ranging from facts and research to opinions and viewpoints to first-hand accounts. Red, of course, favors the movies, and one that stands out is 'Worth," which explores the facts from the perspective of a story (vs. a documentary) while still conveying the power of the events and the people touched by them.

But what about all the young people (like Red's oldest daughter, who was only three at the time, or her youngest, who wasn't even born) who are only experiencing 9/11 through the eyes of others? What do you want them to know or remember? Perhaps, John Kerry said it best,

Remember the hours after September 11th, when we came together as one to answer the attack against our homeland. We drew strength when our firefighters ran up the stairs and risked their lives so that others might live. When rescuers rushed into smoke and fire at the Pentagon. When the men and women of Flight 93 sacrificed themselves to save our nation's Capitol. When flags were hanging from front porches all across America, and strangers became friends. It was the worst day we have ever seen, but it brought out the best in all of us.

So, on the 20th anniversary of 9/11, never forget … the best in all of us.

This name comes with a warning ...

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