Although it’s time to change the clocks (again!), some things never change, including our very different opinions of Daylight Saving Time. But we do agree that the extra darkness requires us to be extra careful.

Love it, hate it, or just don't care about it … but you can't avoid it.

BANTER BITE BACKSTORY: It happens like clockwork every fall, as Red starts to hate the feeling of waking up in darkness, she's pleasantly reminded that the clocks will be turned back shortly; while to Black, who keeps oddball hours, none of it really matters to her, except for having to remember to reset all her clocks.


Red loves the fall and winter months, except when it gets too cold, which she now defines as dropping below freezing. Although she grew up in New York, her decades living in sub-tropical climates (first Hong Kong, then Shanghai, and now Houston) may not have "thinned out her blood" (as the old wives' tale says), but it has made her less tolerant of the cold. But that doesn't stop her from loving when it gets darker earlier, and for the same reason she likes dreary, rainy days (so long as she doesn't have to go out because it causes her hair to frizz) … she welcomes the cozy feeling of being bundled up inside.

Black, on the other hand, is more pragmatic about it. Initially, she thought Daylight Saving Time was instituted to save energy but was surprised to learn it's a moneymaking strategy endorsed by the U.S. Chamber of Commerce. And independent of the fact she prefers the extra sunlight (and vitamin D), she'd like them (she was fascinated to learn "them" is the Department of Transportation, although it would take an Act of Congress to do it) to permanently switch to Daylight Saving Time since we use it most the year anyway. (Sorry, Red.) Not to mention, it would eliminate time wasted resetting all the clocks twice a year.

Thanksgiving dinner may be behind us, but we continue to face increased food prices this holiday season. Some of us can still manage, although it may take some adjustments in eating and shopping habits. But for many, it means “food insecurity” (which is more than just being hungry, it’s a consistent lack of food), with more and more people turning to food banks.

So, if you can, and in the spirit of holiday gift-giving, consider donating to your local food bank. It may end up being the best gift of all because helping others is good for you.(Red knows it makes her feel good and puts her in the holiday spirit, while Black “ignores” the emotional aspects and touts the science behind it.)

Food prices. What goes up must come down. Or not.

BANTER BITE BACKSTORY: Red, like most of us, has been impacted by rising food prices and shortages, while Black knows that understanding “why” that’s happening doesn’t help you put food on the table.

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Some things never change, like our Thanksgiving routines. But that’s ok, as Thanksgiving’s about traditions, so it seems only appropriate that we’d like to repeat what we’ve told you before …

We'll keep this simple and to-the-point … Happy Thanksgiving!

Sadie Hawkins Day started as a made-up holiday in a comic strip called Li’l Abner, but Black finds the idea of women needing a “special day” to feel empowered is … well, comical.

Comic strip or reality show: A group of bachelors participates in a foot race, and whoever's caught by the single woman in the race will become her husband.

BANTER BITE BACKSTORY: We may be sisters, but except for growing up with the same parents in the same house in New York, that may be where the similarities end; especially in terms of dating "protocol" as Black never thought twice about asking boys (and later men) out on a date, while Red never gave it any thought, accepting the convention that boys did the asking. (She did make an exception for her senior prom but was shocked when he accepted.)

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